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2019-02-06 / Police

Six Transported To Hospital After CO Alarm Sounds At Delhi Rehab

By Rosie Cunningham


The Carbon Monoxide Alarm went off at 10:01 a.m. on Tuesday and traces of CO were discovered at Delhi Rehabilitation and Nursing Center. Rosie Cunningham/The Reporter The Carbon Monoxide Alarm went off at 10:01 a.m. on Tuesday and traces of CO were discovered at Delhi Rehabilitation and Nursing Center. Rosie Cunningham/The Reporter At approximately 10 a.m. Tuesday morning, the Delhi Fire Department was dispatched to Delhi Rehabilitation and Nursing Center located on state Route 10 in Delhi.

Delhi Fire Department Chief Tim Murray said the carbon monoxide (CO) alarm went off at the facility. Upon arriving on the scene, Murray said the department determined there were high readings of CO in the kitchen and dining room area.

“About 40 residents were exposed,” he said.

Residents and staff were assessed and six individuals were transported to either Delaware Valley Hospital in Walton or O’Connor Hospital in Delhi.

“The incident was a result of poor ventilation in the kitchen not working properly,” said Murray.

The fire departments of Andes, Bovina, Walton, Cooperstown Medical Transport, Bloomville and Sidney and Delaware County Emergency


The Delhi Fire Department and additional agencies worked to keep employees and residents safe. Rosie Cunningham/The Reporter The Delhi Fire Department and additional agencies worked to keep employees and residents safe. Rosie Cunningham/The Reporter Services were also on the scene. Hancock and Sidney Center EMS was on standby.

“Members of the Delhi Fire Depar tment would like to thank all agencies involved in the incident,” said Murray.

Additionally, he advised individuals to treat a CO alarm the same as they would a fire alarm.

Carbon monoxide is silent and deadly. When an individual is exposed to excess amounts of carbon monoxide, it can build up in your bloodstream. As the concentration of carbon monoxide in the air increases and the lungs begin pulling it in, the body starts replacing oxygen with it. This results in serious damage, unconsciousness, and even death. Since carbon monoxide is colorless, odorless, and tasteless, individuals can be overcome by it without any warning. Proper ventilation of spaces where it could accumulate is vital to prevent poisoning. Homes should also have carbon monoxide detectors to help protect the homeowners. And, if there is ever a doubt, a homeowner can usually contact their local fire department who can check the levels in their home to make sure they are not excessive.



Just after 10 a.m. on Tuesday, the Delhi Fire Department (pictured) was dispatched to Delhi Rehabilitation and Nursing Center. Rosie Cunningham/The Reporter Just after 10 a.m. on Tuesday, the Delhi Fire Department (pictured) was dispatched to Delhi Rehabilitation and Nursing Center. Rosie Cunningham/The Reporter

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