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2018-11-07 / Outdoor Life

SUNY Oneonta and Delaware County SWCD Team Up for Conservation


This group was successful in getting almost 300 trees and shrubs in the ground. From left: Joe LaCourt, Jay Czerniak, Brigid Meyers, Lewis Anthony, Taylor Held, Madison Young, Kyle Buel and Suzanne Dehmer. Contributed Photo This group was successful in getting almost 300 trees and shrubs in the ground. From left: Joe LaCourt, Jay Czerniak, Brigid Meyers, Lewis Anthony, Taylor Held, Madison Young, Kyle Buel and Suzanne Dehmer. Contributed Photo Five members of the SUNY Oneonta Environmental Club joined Joe LaCourt, Jay Czerniak and Kyle Buel of the Delaware County Soil and Water Conservation District (DCSWCD) in a six-hour tree and shrub planting on Ouleout Creek, a tributary of the Susquehanna River, on Saturday, Oct. 20. The streamside planting area, also called a riparian forest buffer, will serve to prevent streambank erosion, provide natural habitat for fish and wildlife and improve water quality by reducing the chance of nutrients entering the streams. This is part of an ongoing effort by farmers in the Susquehanna watershed to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay and meet EPA mandated pollution reductions by 2025 thereby avoiding proposed regulations.

The challenges of rainy weather and rocky soils slowed the work but didn’t dampen the spirits of those involved in the planting of nearly 300 trees and shrubs. The plants ranged from hardwood species such as red maple, sugar maple, and white oak to shrubs like redosier dogwood and winged sumac. The planting is expected to have a high survival rate due to the use of protective planting supplies such as tree tubes and weed control mats, as well as proper planting techniques.

Funding, site preparation, plant stock and planting supplies were provided by the Upper Susquehanna Coalition.

The DCSWCD appreciates the efforts of the SUNY Oneonta Environmental Club and its participating members for their assistance in this project. Community partnerships such as this go a long way in promoting the DCSWCD’s conservation efforts.

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